High resolution radioscope

Figure: 3D model (left) of the high-resolution radioscope used to measure minute sample strain on high pressure samples in the diamond anvil cell.  A radiographic image (right) of an iron sample—the dark rectangle in the center—about 100 microns in diameter and 50 microns thick, sandwiched between two diamond anvils with 300 micron culets.  Note that only the very tips of the anvils are visible in the image.
Figure: 3D model (left) of the high-resolution radioscope used to measure minute sample strain on high pressure samples in the diamond anvil cell. A radiographic image (right) of an iron sample—the dark rectangle in the center—about 100 microns in diameter and 50 microns thick, sandwiched between two diamond anvils with 300 micron culets. Note that only the very tips of the anvils are visible in the image.

Recently a new high-precision radioscope was designed, assembled, and commissioned at station 16-ID-B.  New features include a CCD camera with pixels one fourth the area of the previous cameras, a turning mirror incorporated within a conventional beamstop (allowing for simultaneous x-ray imaging and radial x-ray diffraction), and an ultrathin scintillator.  The overall design is compact and can be easy installed at any beamline using HPCAT’s existing motion control configuration for online optical systems.  The commissioning goal for the new radioscope was to measure minute strain applied to a sample in a diamond anvil cell by measuring the relative displacement of the diamond anvils (see radiograph below).  Commissioning results demonstrate a capability of measuring sub-micron compression and decompression strokes.  The compact design and high resolution make it possible to explore more advanced x-ray imaging techniques including, for example, tomography.