Comparing carbon's compatibility with silicates and with iron

New work published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals how carbon behaved during Earth’s violent formative period. The findings can help scientists understand how much carbon likely exists in the planet’s core and the contributions it could make to the chemical and dynamic activity occurring there—including to the convective motion powering the magnetic field that protects Earth from cosmic radiation.

Moises Exposito-Alonso

Carnegie evolutionary geneticist Moises Exposito-Alonso was named a member of the 2020 class of Forbes’ 30 Under 30 Europe list in science and healthcare. He was recognized for his lab’s pioneering use of genomic techniques to understand how plant species will evolve and keep pace with a changing climate. 

Caltech logo

The Carnegie Institution for Science is consolidating our California research departments into an expanded presence in Pasadena. With this move, we are building on our existing relationship with Caltech, with a goal of broadening our historic collaborations in astronomy and astrophysics and pursuing new opportunities in ecology and plant biology that will support the global fight against climate change.

Yixian Zheng

Carnegie’s Director of Embryology Yixian Zheng is one of 15 scientists awarded a grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to support research on symbiosis in aquatic systems. For the past two years, Zheng and her colleagues have been working to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of endosymbiosis in the relationships between coral and jellyfish and the photosynthetic algal species that they host. She has been building on Carnegie’s longstanding tradition of model organism development to begin revealing the genetics underlying the uptake and sustenance of symbiotic dinoflagellates by the soft coral species Xenia.

 Illustration of DS Tuc AB by M. Weiss, CfA.

A new kind of astronomical observation helped reveal the possible evolutionary history of a baby Neptune-like exoplanet. To study a very young planet called DS Tuc Ab, a Harvard & Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics-led team that included six Carnegie astronomers—Johanna Teske, Sharon Wang, Stephen Shectman, Paul Butler, Jeff Crane, and Ian Thompson—developed a new observational modeling tool. Their work will be published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters and represents the first time the orbital tilt of a planet younger than 45 million years—or about 1/100th the age of the Solar System—has been measured.

Illustration courtesy of Navid Marvi and Andres Aranda-Diaz.

What can our micobiome's response to antibiotics teach us about species interactions in nature? New work from Carnegie Embryology and Stanford University set out to answer this challenging question and discovered a new form of antibiotic tolerance.

John Mulchaey

John Mulchaey Director and Crawford H. Greenewalt Chair of the Carnegie Observatories was presented with a Humanitarian STAR Award by the honor’s founding body—the Rotary Club of Sierra Madre. Mulchaey was selected for the club’s Helios award in acknowledgment of his longstanding efforts at promoting outreach events and activities to share astronomy with enthusiasts of all ages throughout the Los Angeles area.

Artist’s concept by Robin Dienel, courtesy Carnegie Science

Some of the extremely low-density, “cotton candy like” exoplanets called super-puffs may actually have rings, according to new research published in The Astronomical Journal by Carnegie’s Anthony Piro and Caltech’s Shreyas Vissapragada

Downwelling field experiment at Searsville Reservoir. Courtesy Nona Chiariello.

Could pumping oxygen-rich surface water into the depths of lakes, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters help ameliorate dangerous dead zones? New work led by Carnegie’s David Koweek and Ken Caldeira and published open access by Science of the Total Environment says yes, although they caution that further research would be needed to understand any possible side effects before implementing such an approach.

Bellymount allows researchers to peer into the live tissue of the fruit fly gut.

They say a picture is worth 1,000 words. But what about a real-time window into the complexity of the gastrointestinal system? A new research tool allowed biologists to watch in real time the cell renewal process that keeps gut tissue healthy, as well as the interactions between bacterial species that make up the microbiome. Their work, led by Lucy O’Brien and KC Huang of Stanford University and Carnegie’s Will Ludington, was recently published by PLOS Biology.

Moises Exposito-Alonso

Carnegie’s Moises Exposito-Alonso is one of four recipients of the American Society of Naturalists’ Jasper Loftus-Hills Young Investigator Award in recognition of “outstanding and promising work” by individuals who are within three years of completing their Ph.D or in their final year of graduate school.

Carnegie astronomers Stephen Shectman and Alycia Weinberger were selected for the inaugural class of Fellows of the American Astronomical Society in recognition of their “extraordinary achievement and service” to the field.

Land and air pollution in Amravati, India, purchased from Shutterstock.

Aerosol emissions from burning coal and wood are dangerous to human health, but it turns out that by cooling the Earth they also diminish global economic inequality.

Photo is by Cindy Werner, courtesy of Alaska Volcano Observatory.

A new approach to analyzing seismic data reveals deep vertical zones of low seismic velocity in the plumbing system underlying Alaska’s Cleveland volcano, one of the most-active of the more than 70 Aleutian volcanoes. The findings are published in Scientific Reports by Helen Janiszewski, recently of Carnegie, now at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, and Carnegie’s Lara Wagner and Diana Roman. Unlike typical seismic imaging experiments that deploy dozens of seismometers, this study used only eight.

Photo credit: Max Hirshfeld Studio, courtesy of AIP Emilio Segrè Visual Archives

Carnegie trustee emeritus Frank Press, a National Medal of Science laureate and former president of the National Academy of Sciences, died January 29 at his home in Chapel Hill, N.C. He was 95. Press was active on the Carnegie board of trustees for 14 years and was the Cecil and Ida Green Senior Fellow at the institution’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism from 1

Carnegie Earth and Planets Director Richard Carlson

Richard Carlson, director of Carnegie Science’s Earth and Planets division, has been chosen to receive the Geochemical Society’s highest honor, the Victor Moritz Goldschmidt Award, in recognition of his forefront research into the formation of the Solar System and the geologic history of the Earth.

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED TO LIMIT OUR COMMUNITY'S EXPOSURE TO COVID-19, IN ACCORDANCE WITH GUIDANCE FROM THE CENTERS FOR DISEASE C

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED TO LIMIT OUR COMMUNITY'S EXPOSURE TO COVID-19, IN ACCORDANCE WITH GUIDANCE FROM THE CENTERS FOR DISE

Hearing is the gateway to verbal communication.